Monday, May 27, 2013

The Candid Frame #188 - Will Jax


After a short-lived tenure as a junior high school teacher and coach, then a flirtation with filmmaking, Will Jacks finally settled in on a career as a photographer. Eager to get started, he left Journalism graduate school in 1996, even though he was only a few hours shy of receiving his degree. His business has grown to serve a diverse clientele of commercial and editorial clients throughout the southeast, and his personal work is represented in several galleries in the region. In addition, his documentary work of the Mississippi Delta is a prominent part of the Viking Range permanent archives.
Will is also active in the photographic and arts communities, serving as a past executive board member for the Delta Arts Alliance, a governor-appointed board member of the Mississippi Blues Commission, and as a judge for the ShootQ Grant, among others. He also owns and operates a small photography gallery focusing on imagery from the Mississippi Delta, and just this spring has re-enrolled at the University of Mississippi in order to finally complete his Master’s Degree.

He and his wife Jamie, as well as their two pound puppies, Sam and Homer, live part-time in the Mississippi Delta and part-time in the French Quarter of New Orleans. You can learn more about Will and his work by visiting his website

Will Jax recommends the work of Birney Imes, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Jack Spencer, and Dave Wittig

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Discover  the work of thirty great photographer's in Ibarionex's latest book,Photoshop Master Class: Photoshop Inspiring artwork and tutorials by established and emerging artists.

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Glitz and Grammer

Anja van der Spuy goes by many names, but I like to call her the Leopard Lady, dude to the well known fact of her intense love for leopard print. She's a talented lady, working full time, blogger of Glitz and Grammer, twitter addict with a love for fashion and dreams of becoming a princess. And our #NadineAnjacollab started over a few tweets on Twitter. I was thrilled to get the opportunity of having Anja playing model for me, with her unlimited collection of leopard print clothes, accessories and fur (and other stylish items).


















































Wednesday, May 22, 2013

May - This & That

So another month is almost at it's end. I've realized I've not posted much on the blog because I've been keeping myself busy with "smaller" projects that I've been sharing on Facebook. Well, here's what I've been up to:

I shot a gorgeous family shoot (for the second time)
A sneak peek of a epic shoot I did with the talented Anja van der Spuy, blogger of Glitz & Grammer
Misty mornings, night drives and some "wild life"
Another beautiful portrait shoot preview of my beautiful friend
Found my dream wristwatch after spending 5 years looking for it
I also co-hosted The South Africa Music Scene radio show on Assembly radio (oh, it was so much fun!)
I downloaded SO MUCH FREE FONTS. I just want to think up excuses to use them all the time!
And I tried to make a digital double exposure on Photoshop, I don't think I nailed it but I like the look.




Monday, May 20, 2013

Miss GHS Event

Lucky me got invited as a special guest to the Miss GHS 2013 event. It was so great being there and seeing their hard work paid off. The girls look more lovely than ever and astonished everyone when they preformed scenes portraying who they are. Be sure to click here to see a peek of their portraits that I've photographed in April.


































Congratulations to Liza Marie Fourie for being chosen as Miss GHS 2013 and getting picked for miss photogenic as well!

Sunday, May 19, 2013

The Candid Frame #187 - Joshua Mann Pailet

Joshua Mann Pailet was born in New Orleans in 1950 and raised in Baton Rouge, LA.  He graduated from Rice University in 1972 and 1973 with a B.A. in Economics and a B.S. in Accounting. 

In 1973 Pailet founded A Gallery for Fine Photography to create a venue to collect, display and sell 19th and 20th Century photographs. He taught at Louisiana State University (Spring 1977).

Though he has photographed locations across the country, the greater body of his work revolves around the city of New Orleans, which has allowed him to document life there for the last several decades, especially the years after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. You can discover more about Joshua, his gallery and his own work by visiting his website

Joshua Mann Pailet recommends the work of Josephine Sacabo and Louviere + Vanessa

Support the work we do on the podcast by donating using PayPal. Your contributions help directly in us continuing to bring great interviews every week directly to you.


 
Discover  the work of thirty great photographer's in Ibarionex's latest book,Photoshop Master Class: Photoshop Inspiring artwork and tutorials by established and emerging artists.

You can also subscribe to the show via iTunes by clicking here.

Or you can directly download the MP3 file by clicking here.



Visit and subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking here.

And take advantage of the a 14-day free trial of Squarespace to create your own photo website and blog. Click below to get started. 






Sunday, May 12, 2013

The Candid Frame #186 - Corwin Hiebert


Corwin Hiebert is a management and marketing consultant to creative entrepreneurs (like world-renowned photographer and best-selling author David duChemin). He is the author of the new book Living the Dream: Putting Your Creativity to Work [and Getting Paid] and he's the business development instructor at the Vancouver Institute of Media Arts. His company is called Taendem Agency. He doesn't blog, he delivers.

You can learn more about Corwin and his work by visiting his website or contact to him directly if you are interested having him serve as a consultant to your business. 

Corwin Hiebert recommends the work of Nick Hall.


Support the work we do on the podcast by donating using PayPal. Your contributions help directly in us continuing to bring great interviews every week directly to you.
 

Discover  the work of thirty great photographer's in Ibarionex's latest book,Photoshop Master Class: Photoshop Inspiring artwork and tutorials by established and emerging artists.
You can also subscribe to the show via iTunes by clicking here.

Or you can directly download the MP3 file by clicking here.





Visit and subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking here.
And take advantage of the a 14-day free trial of Squarespace to create your own photo website and blog. Click below to get started. 

Sunday, May 5, 2013

The Candid Frame #185 - Ken Light


Ken Light is a social documentary photographer, and educator, whose work has appeared in books, magazines, catalogues, on-line media and exhibitions. He is the author of eight books including his most recent book, Valley of Shadows and Dreams (published by Heyday, 2012). Additional books include Coal Hollow, published in 2006 by The University of California Press, his text Witness In Our Time; Working Lives of Documentary Photographers was published by the Smithsonian Institution Press in October 2000 and in a revised second edition in 2010. His photo book Texas Death Row University Press of Mississippi was published in the fall of 1997. Texas Death Row is a look at life inside the death house as the condemned wait to be executed in Americas largest and most active Death Row.
He is a professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California Berkeley and 2012 Laventhol Visiting Professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He has taught workshops at the ICP in New York City, The Missouri Workshop, Anderson Ranch, the S.F. Art Institute and the School for Photographic Studies in Prague. He was editor of the university of California Press series on contemporary photography and a founder of the International Fund for Documentary Photography which awarded grants to photographers internationally and Fotovision.org anon-profit documentary organization based In San Francisco, California. He is associated with the editorial photo agency Contact Press Images in New York City. You can discover about him and his work by visiting his website
Ken Light recommends the work of Ken Schles.

Check out Ken's book Witness in Our TimeL Working Lives of Documentary Photographers by clicking on the image below.
Support the work we do on the podcast by donating using PayPal. Your contributions help directly in us continuing to bring great interviews every week directly to you.

 

Discover  the work of thirty great photographer's in Ibarionex's latest book,Photoshop Master Class: Photoshop Inspiring artwork and tutorials by established and emerging artists.
You can also subscribe to the show via iTunes by clicking here.

Or you can directly download the MP3 file by clicking here.


Visit and subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking here.

And take advantage of the a 14-day free trial of Squarespace to create your own photo website and blog. Click below to get started. 


Review: Adorama Blue Monolight (Flashpoint Digital DG-600 II)

The way I use light for portrait work has been largely born from my street photography. This has meant using available light, controlled with modifiers including reflectors, scrims and flags.

 The challenge of working this way revolves around the quantity of light that I have to work with. As I like to shoot in areas of open shade, this has often resulted in using higher ISOs at wider apertures, which can be very limiting.

 So, when I had the opportunity to review the Adorama Blue Monolight (Flashpoint Digital DG-600 II), I thought it would be a good way to introduce a strobe into my repertoire.

The 300 watt-seconds strobe is a monolight, which means it directly supports both AC/DC power and doesn’t require a pack generator system, which is important, if like me, you don’t want to carry too much equipment in the field. An optional Flashpoint DG Battery Pack and Charger is light, compact, and makes for a complete system that I could take anywhere. 

Weighing just 4 pounds and measuring 4 x 4.75 x 7.5 inches, the monolight is very portable and its rugged metal housing makes it ideal for working with it outside of a studio.

Though 300 watt-seconds doesn’t seem like a lot of power, it is actually more than enough to suit my needs. I wasn’t looking to completely change my approach, but rather to enhance it and provide myself a greater degree of flexibility. By introducing the monolight in the scene shot in open shade, I'm able to not only have the benefit of working with smaller apertures, but also improve color saturation and create contrast between the subject and the background based on brightness.

 The unit has a Guide Number of 58 m/190 ft @ ISO 100 provides a 5 f-stop range, which you can reduce to 1/32 power by a knob control on the back of the unit, which also features   a digital read-out of the power output. So, it was an easy thing to adjust the output of the strobe to compliment the available light that I was working with.

For my shots of Dana Barsuhn, a Los Angeles-based street photographer, I knew I wanted to photograph against this hedge. If I had photographed him as I had in the past, the open shade would have provided even illumination not only for him, but also for the overall scene, which is a good starting- point. But since I wanted to work with a smaller aperture and didn’t want to increase my ISO to 800 or higher to achieve the shot, the use of the monolight diffused with an umbrella was the ticket.
I was able to shoot at 1/60 at f/9, which resulted in him being well illuminated by the background being slightly underexposed, which I accentuated later in Adobe Lightroom. 

One of the noticeable improvements was the increased color saturation especially with respect to the skin tones. Though open shade provides a soft, even source of illumination, color saturation is often reduced. So, unless I use a reflector to direct some of sunlight back onto the subject, it results in my having to adjust for that when post-processing the image. Simply by using the monolight, I was able to achieve that look within seconds.

The monolight is daylight balanced (5600K) and it provided consistent color accuracy throughout as I increased and decreased the power output, which is important especially when working with skin tone.
For the second shot, which showcased Dana’s classic 1966 Ford Mustang, I used a higher ISO setting to get some detail in depth of the garage, while the monolight provides the main illumination for him and that sweet car. The image was shot at ISO 400 at 1/125 second at f/8.

Because the light was positioned further away than the other shot, the light was a little harder, but it still worked for me here. The monolight made all the difference here, because that small aperture was really necessary to achieve a deeper depth of field, which nicely rendered all the detail in the garage. Had I shot this using strictly available light, I would have needed to work at a higher ISO order to achieve that same depth of field, but with an increase in noise.

 It would have also resulted in the back of the garage being significantly darker because of the light fall-off. This shot would not have been possible without the use of the light.

When I saw the bike hanging against that richly detailed garage wall, I knew I wanted a portrait that included these elements. For this, I removed the umbrella and only used the 8-inch reflector, which comes with the monolight. This resulted in a much harder quality of light, which produced more pronounced shadows, but which I thought fit the fill of the image that I was going for.

Shot at ISO 400 with an exposure of 1/100 second at f/8, I was able to get a look that wouldn’t have been possible with just available light. The improved depth of field and the color really made the monolight a valuable tool.

Though I would have liked to have more positive click-stops when adjusting the power output, that’s largely a personal preference. The digital read-out though bright, can be a little hard to read when I am in a bright situation and when the monolight is positioned relatively high on the light stand.

 At a price point of just $199.95 for the monolight and 129.95 for the DG Battery pack, it provides a very affordable portable lighting kit, especially if you want to move up from using speedlights.

 Other photographer might have a need for more power, shorter flash durations and other features, but I found that this unit provided me everything that I needed for my current way of shooting. It’s nice to find a very affordable piece of kit that caters to my way of shooting, rather than me having to completely change the way I shoot to serve the equipment.

 You can find out more about the Blue Monlight by visiting the Adorama website at www.adorama.com.